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Archaeo News 

10 April 2004
Protection plan for ancient British sites

One of the most important of the ancient industrial sites in Britain, which can be found in the heart of the Lake District, is to be used as part of a pilot scheme to find new ways to protect heritage. At present, listed buildings, ancient monuments and historic parks, gardens and battlefields are governed by different rules but English Heritage wants to simplify them under one system.
     The Neolithic remains dotted around the Lakes, where evidence of the beginnings of civilisation can be found, are constantly under attack from the hordes of walkers and climbers who pass over them. Now English Heritage wants to take positive steps to protect them in a move which could form the blueprint for future preservation of archaeology. Proposals for the new system have been drawn up by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport.
     John Darlington, National Trust area manager for the South Lakes, said: "The Neolithic axe factories of Great Langdale and Scafell Pike are some of the most remarkable industrial sites in Britain. "They also represent a considerable management challenge. Dramatically located amongst the high fells of the central Lake District these internationally important prehistoric sites are vulnerable to erosion and disturbance."
     Andrew Davison, English Heritage inspector of ancient monument for the North West, said: "While maintaining the present levels of statutory protection, the aim of the new system is to change the culture of protecting the historic environment. Hopefully, the project will be completed early next year. We can then collate the results and begin the consultation process with site owners and occupiers."

Sources: BBC News (7 April 2004), The Cumberland News (9 April 2004)

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