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Archaeo News 

25 November 2004
Mycenaean tomb found in southern Greece

Archeologists have discovered an unraided tomb with various artifacts dating from the Mycenaean period more than 3 000 years ago in southern Greece. The vault-shaped tomb, carved in natural rock, was found during earthworks near Peristeri, 50km south of the town of Sparta. Two graves and the bones of eight people were brought to light, the Greek Culture Ministry said in a statement.
     Of particular interest were artifacts neatly placed around the skull and bones of a young person found in the grave. They included a seal and buttons made from soapstone, glass and amber beads, as well as a bronze ring, razor, knife and hairclip.
     The Mycenaean culture, named after its capital city Mycenae, which was excavated in 1876 about 150km north of Sparta, flowered from 1580-1100 BCE.

Source: Iol.co.za (22 November 2004)

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