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29 January 2007
Metallurgy in ancient India was advanced

Metallurgical engineer and former rector of the Banaras Hindu University Prof TR Anatharaman said that ancient India contributed a lot in the field of metallurgy. He delivered a lecture on 'Metallurgical Marvels of Ancient India' on the seminar on 'History of Indian Science and Technology' at Swatantrata Bhawan in BHU.
     Prof Anatharaman said that recent historical studies and scientific researches have thrown considerable new light on the status of metal extraction and working in Indian sub-continent during the ancient period (1700 BCE to 1000 CE). He said that the world-famous ancient Damascus Swords had its origin in India. "The Damascus Swords were fabricated from Ultra-high Carbon Steel, known commercially as Wootz, was produced in South India particularly in the state of Andhra Pradesh around 400 BCE," he said. "Fabrication of the Iron Pillar, seven-ton heavy and seven meter tall at Delhi known for its amazing corrosion resistance despite exposure to the Sun, wind, dust and rain in the open for more than 16 centuries is another metallurgical marvel of ancient India," he added.
     Dr K Krishnan of Archaeology and Ancient History Department at The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda (Vadodara) delivered a lecture on 'Ceramic Technology: Its Beginning and Advancements in The Indian Sub-Continent.' He said that ceramic technology develops with the emergence of the first agricultural communities, designated by the cultural phase ‘Neolithic', which had a wide distribution in the sub-continent in space and time."

Hindustan Times (25 January 2007)

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