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6 December 2008
Thera volcano catastrophe dated to 1613 BCE

Two olive branches buried by a Minoan-era eruption of the volcano on the island of Thera (modern-day Santorini, Greece) have enabled precise radiocarbon dating of the catastrophe to 1613 BCE, with an error margin of plus or minus 10 years, according to two researchers who presented conclusions of their previously published research during an event at the Danish Archaeological Institute of Athens.
     Speaking at an event entitled 'The Enigma of Dating the Minoan Eruption - Data from Santorini and Egypt', the study's authors, Dr. Walter Friedrich of the Danish University of Aarhus and Dr. Walter Kutschera of the Austrian University of Vienna, said data left by the branch of an olive tree with 72 annular growth rings was used for dating via the radiocarbon method, while a second olive branch - found just nine metres away from the first - was unearthed in July 2007 and has not yet been analysed.  The researchers said both olive tree branches were found near a Bronze Age man-made wall, giving the impression that they were part of an olive grove situated near a settlement very close to the edge of Santorini's current world-famous Caldera. The two trees were found standing when unearthed, and apparently had been covered by the Theran pumice immediately after the volcano's eruption. 
     According to the two scientists, other radiocarbon testing from archaeological locations on Santorini and the surrounding islands, as well as at Tel el-Dab'a in the Nile delta in Egypt, corroborate the dating based on the olive tree. On the other hand, as the two researchers pointed out, archaeological evidence linked with the Historical Dating of Ancient Egypt indicate that the Thera eruption must have occurred after the start of the New Kingdom in Egypt in 1530 BCE. The two researchers said their find (olive tree) represents a serious contradiction between the results of the scientific method (radiocarbon dating) and scholarly work in the humanities (history-archaeology), with both sides holding strong arguments to support their conclusions. The radiocarbon dating places the cataclysmic eruption, blamed for heralding the end to the Minoan civilisation, a century earlier than previous scientific finds.

Source: ANA (5 December 2008)

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