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12 September 2009
Fairy tales have ancient origin

A study by anthropologists has explored the origins of folk tales and traced the relationship between varients of the stories recounted by cultures around the world. The researchers adopted techniques used by biologists to create the taxonomic tree of life, which shows how every species comes from a common ancestor.
     Dr Jamie Tehrani, a cultural anthropologist at Durham University, studied 35 versions of Little Red Riding Hood from around the world. Contrary to the view that the tale originated in France shortly before Charles Perrault produced the first written version in the 17th century, Dr Tehrani found that the varients shared a common ancestor dating back more than 2,600 years. He said: "Over time these folk tales have been subtly changed and have evolved just like an biological organism. Because many of them were not written down until much later, they have been misremembered or reinvented through hundreds of generations. By looking at how these folk tales have spread and changed it tells us something about human psychology and what sort of things we find memorable. The oldest tale we found was an Aesopic fable that dated from about the sixth century BCE, so the last common ancestor of all these tales certainly predated this. We are looking at a very ancient tale that evolved over time."
     Dr Tehrani, who will present his work on Tuesday at the British Science Festival in Guildford, Surrey, identified 70 variables in plot and characters between different versions of Little Red Riding Hood. He found that the stories could be grouped into distinct families according to how they evolved over time. Professor Jack Zipes, a retired professor of German at the University of Minnesota who is an expert on fairy tales and their origins, described the work as 'exciting'. He believes folk tales may have helped people to pass on tips for survival to new generations. He said: "Little Red Riding Hood is about violation or rape, and I suspect that humans were just as violent in 600 BCE as they are today, so they will have exchanged tales about all types of violent acts. I have tried to show that tales relevant to our adaptation to the environment and survival are stored in our brains and we consistently use them for all kinds of reference points."

Source: Telegraph.co.uk (5 September 2009)

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