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14 September 2011
Ancient stone anchors may rewrite history of Black Sea sailing

Massive ancient stone anchors were found by divers participating in an archaeological expedition near the southern Bulgarian Black Sea town of Sozopol. The expedition, led by deputy director of Bulgaria's National Historical Museum Dr Ivan Hristov, found the artifacts west of the Sts. Cyricus and Julitta island.
     The 200-kg beautifully ornamented anchors have two holes in them - one for the anchor rope and another one for a wooden stick. They were used for 150-200-ton ships that transported mainly wheat, but also dried and salted fish, skins, timber and metals from what now is Bulgaria's coast.
     The anchors' shape suggests they were used by Creto-Mycanaean, Phoenician or Carian sailors in the 15th-12th centuries BCE, which would stand against the hypothesis that Greeks were the first Black Sea sailors starting the 12th century BCE. The anchors are also said to show that the Trojan war may have started because of excise duties imposed by the Trojans, who took advantage of their control over the Dardanelles.

Edited from Novinite (12 September 2011)

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