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Archaeo News  

July 2009 index:

7 July 2009
Additional news from the dig in County Down
The team behind the dig at the A1 Loughbrickland road scheme (County Down, Northern Ireland) has uncovered not just a Bronze Age burial ground but also a Neolithic settlement dating...
Archaeologists unravel North Carolina's ancient secrets
Plastic bags packed with pottery shards fill 5-gallon buckets inside a metal storage container a few hundred yards from the edge of the Macon County Airport runway. Airplanes throttle for...
Insecurity forces archaeologists to abandon digs in Pakistan
Foreign archaeologists involved in excavation work to explore the Indus Valley Civilisation in Pakistan have left the country due to the war-like situation. The experts from the US, Europe and...
Prehistoric settlement unearthed in Yorkshire
Remains of some of the earliest houses ever found in the North of England have been unearthed in Bridlington (East Riding of Yorkshire). Archaeologists have discovered that buildings stood on...
How chemistry can reveal the secrets of ancient worlds
The day-to-day lives of prehistoric humans have been revealed following new research developed by chemists at the University of Bristol. The research, which combines archaeology with cutting-edge chemistry allowing scientists...
Bulgarian archaeologists discover 7,000-year-old settlement
Bulgarian archaeologists have discovered a 7,000-year-old settlement close to the northeast city of Shumen. The village dates back to the Stone-Copper Age, and is located in the locality of Chanadzhik,...
Ancient burial of a child uncovered in Vietnam
An archaeological excavation in southern Vietnam of a site more than 3000 years old has shed new light on how the death of young children was viewed by community members...
No Etruscan link to modern Tuscans
The current population of Tuscany is not descended from the Etruscans, the people that lived in the region during the Bronze Age, a new Italian study has shown. Researchers at...
Private group offers to run prehistoric site in Ohio
A nonprofit group has offered to take over management of Fort Ancient, a prehistoric Indian site located in Ohio (USA) that faced with closing this summer because of proposed cuts...
Arsenic poisoning victims in Chile in 5000 BCE
Seven thousand years ago, about 100 km from the contemporary port city of Arica in Chile, a child died. The grieving parents did not want to part with the last...
New research network for underwater archaeology
Up to 3.2 million square kilometers of the European continental shelf (about 40 per cent of Europe's land mass) was exposed as dry land during the periods of lower sea...
Prehistoric henge may be the largest in Lincolnshire
Remains of a prehistoric henge could be lying just feet below a Lincolnshire (England) field, say experts. Studies of a large site in Navenby, north of Lincoln, have revealed telltale...
13 July 2009
Pipeline work digs up artifacts in Nebraska
A pre-construction crew with the Keystone Pipeline project, which originates in Hardesty, Canada, and is currently digging the pipeline route in northeast Nebraska (USA), found evidence of prehistoric artifacts while...
Festival of British archaeology (18th July - 2nd August 2009)
The Festival of British Archaeology 2009 is an annual extravaganza of heritage events coordinated by the Council for British Archaeology. Each year the Festival helps museums, local societies, national and...
Ancient supervolcano's eruption caused severe winters
Previous studies have suggested that Indonesia's Toba supervolcano, when it erupted about 74,000 years ago, triggered a 1,000-year episode of ice sheet advance, and also may have produced a short-lived...
Switzerland proposes underwater UNESCO sites
The Swiss Federal Office of Culture has unveiled its next dossier bound for a UNESCO heritage panel: the underwater ruins of lakeside communities from the Neolithic and the Bronze ages....
Humans ate fish 40,000 years ago
Freshwater fish are a major part of the diet of many peoples around the world, but it has been unclear when fish became a significant part of the year-round diet...
Mesolithic human traces discovered in Romania
Human traces dating from the Early Mesolithic Period were recently discovered at the Schela Cladovei archaeological site in south-western Romania by experts from the University of Edinburgh and of the...
Illness brought down early human rival
Scientists seeking to uncover the mystery of what happened to the Neanderthals should look to the modus operandi of another great die-off 30,000 years later, argues a Danish expert in...
BorgerMeetings: conferences on the Funnelbeaker culture
The Megalith Museum 'Hunebedcentrum Borger', dr J.A. Bakker and Hazenberg Archeologie will organize the BorgerMeetings, a series of international TRB conferences. The first of these conferences will be held in...
15 new prehistoric sites found in Java
Up to 15 new prehistoric sites have been discovered recently in Purbalingga regency, Central Java. The head of Purbalingga administration's Media Information Division, Prayitno, said the sites were spread across...
The Prehistoric Peak
Andrew Johnstone started to work with Britain's prehistory as his subject matter in 2007, when he was accepted onto the MA Communication Design course at Central Saint Martins College of...
Secrets of Bradford hill fort under the microscope
Described by one archaeologist as the unluckiest hill fort in Wiltshire (England), the Iron Age past of Budbury in Bradford on Avon remains to this day shrouded in mystery. Local...
Gristhorpe Man slowly gives up his secrets
Last July 10th marked the 175th anniversary of the discovery of Scarborough's bronze age ancestor, Gristhorpe Man. Now residing in the Rotunda Museum (North Yorkshire, England), Gristhorpe Man, the tallest...
Underwater exploration seeks evidence of early Americans
Last summer's pivotal underwater exploration in the Gulf of Mexico led by Mercyhurst College archaeologist Dr. James Adovasio yielded evidence of inundated terrestrial sites that may well have supported human...
Danish students uncover hundreds of Iron Age remains
There was a sensational find when Århus archaeology students uncovered the bones of around 200 bodies dating from the Iron Age. What was supposed to be a simple three week...
Africa's oldest ceramic unearthed in Mali
Archaeologists from Geneva University have discovered what they claim is Africa's oldest ceramic, dated at around 9,400 BCE, in eastern Mali. "It's a tiny, ornate fragment that was made with...
19 July 2009
Stone rings unearthed at prehistoric sites in Java
An archeological research team from the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB) and the Purwokerto-based Jendral Sudirman University has discovered at least 50 new sites rich in prehistoric relics along the...
Ancient dwelling unearthed at Isle of Man airport
A prehistoric dwelling - 3,000 years older than Stonehenge - has been unearthed during construction of the runway extension at Isle of Man Airport. Dating back an astonishing 8,000 years...
Bronze Age sanctuary discovered in Bulgaria
A team of Bulgarian archaeologists has uncovered a Bronze Age sanctuary near the village of Kran, close to the town of Kazanlak in Central Bulgaria. The team led by Professor...
Isotope analysis dates ancient Mexican
After years of controversy, a new study shows that the skeleton of Mexico's Tepexpan Man is nearly 5,000 years old and lived on the shores of a tree-lined lake. Nowadays...
Dental wear establishes when hominids lived at sites
For many years, the mobility of the groups of hominids and how long they spent in caves or outdoors has been a subject of discussion among scientists. Now, an international...
Children find ancient bones at Irish golf club
An expert from the Irish National Museum was this week examining the site of an ancient grave found on Ballybunion golf course (County Kerry, Ireland) by children. A human skeleton...
News from Flag Fen
Peterborough's Bronze Age site Flag Fen (England) has struck gold in the form of a £2,000 grant from a DIY giant, thanks to its 21st century business plan. Nyree Ambarchain,...
New findings on ancient snake cult in UAE
New research into a snake cult that lived in the mountains near Masafi (United Arabian Emirates) during the Iron Age will be presented at the world's leading conference on Arabian...
Cave record of Britain's pioneers
The Cheddar Gorge in Somerset (England) was one of the first sites inhabited by humans when they returned to Britain towards the end of the last Ice Age. New radiocarbon...
Neanderthals were few and poised for extinction
For much of their 400,000 year history, Neanderthals were few and far between, a new analysis of genetic material from several of the extinct, ancient humans now suggests. In fact,...
Megalithic burial site excavated in India
A huge megalithic burial site said to date back to 3rd Century BCE has been unearthed near Tiruvannamalai (Tamil Nadu, India). Human skeletal remains, iron daggers and a sword, decorated...
Oetzi's tattoos came from fireplace
The 57 tattoos sported by Oetzi, the 5300-year-old iceman mummy found in Italy, were made from fireplace soot that contained glittering, colorful precious stone crystals, according to an upcoming study...
26 July 2009
Excavation in Lebanon aims to uncover ancient ruins
The Directorate-General of Antiquities, Lebanon, has said that it plans to resume excavation at the Freres archaeological site in the old city of Sidon in collaboration with a delegation of...
How clothing has given humans an edge over other species
In a new study, a scientist is analyzing how humans came to develop clothing, and how that innovation might have in turn given our species an evolutionary edge over other...
Prehistoric American Indian settlement discovered in Ohio
The earliest suggestion of something worth uncovering on thias plateau above the Huron River (Ohio, USA) were some dark electronic smudges on a piece of graph paper. The smudges piqued...
Did a comet really smash into Canada 13,000 years ago?
A team of U.S. scientists that has unearthed a layer of microscopic diamonds on a California island (USA) is calling the find a possible 'smoking gun' to prove a controversial...
Ancient population boom in India explained
Thirty-five thousand years ago, a diminutive innovation transformed India. The advent of stone microblades set the stage for the subcontinent's explosive population growth, new research suggests. The easy-to-manufacture tools -...
Human stabbed a Neanderthal, evidence suggests
The wound that ultimately killed a Neanderthal man between 50,000 and 75,000 years was most likely caused by a thrown spear, the kind modern humans used but Neanderthals did not,...
Evidence from a 4000-year-old party in Peru
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found evidence of a grand scale party by ancient humans 4,000 years ago, in the form of remnants that still remain in the...
Remains of ancient buildings found in Croatia
Archaeologists have spent 12 years researching the 8,000 year old 'Starcevacka Kultura' (Starcevacka Culture) from the Neolithic. This is the first time that remains have been found above ground. "This...
First settlements in Cyprus may be older than thought
Archaeologists in Cyprus found evidence that inhabitants of the Mediterranean island may have abandoned a nomadic lifestyle for agriculture-based settlements earlier than previously believed. The excavations at the Politiko-Troullia site,...
Stonehenge - A 1-day course at the University of Oxford
Next Saturday 23rd January 2010, a one-day course simply titled 'Stonehenge' will be held at the University of Oxford (England). Through the presentations to this dayschool you will get behind...
DNA confirms coastal trek to Australia
DNA evidence linking Indian tribes to Australian Aboriginal people supports the theory humans arrived in Australia from Africa via a southern coastal route through India, say researchers. The research, lead...
Mesolithic finds in Birmingham
Archaeologists have uncovered remarkable evidence that stone age man lived in the centre of Birmingham (England) more than 10,000 years ago. The settlers used basic flint knives to hunt and...
Archeologists discover 20,000-year-old hearth in Taiwan
A team from Academia Sinica has recently discovered a Neolithic stone hearth in a cave in Taitung County that has been confirmed as the earliest human relic to have been...

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