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Archaeo News  

August 2009 index:

1 August 2009
Digging archaeology along a pipeline in Nebraska
Last April TransCanada Keystone pipeline archaeologists discovered a small village 6-10 feet beneath the surface of one of Dennis Arens Sr.'s farm fields near Hartington in Nebraska (USA). During archaeological...
New device traces archaeological finds fast
Every object unearthed by an archaeological dig must have its exact position recorded. This is normally a painstaking process involving measuring rods and string, but a device that uses technology...
3,000-year-old ax found by an 8-year-old child in Maryland
A strangely-shaped rock that 8-year-old Heather Flaherty of Crownsville (Maryland, USA) picked up in her backyard turned out to be an ancient ax. Heather found the stone implement July 8...
Findings of hill fort project unveiled in Buckinghamshire
The findings of a major three year long archaeological project examining Iron Age hill forts were put on display at Danesfield Hotel, Henley Road, Marlow (Buckinghamshire, England). An information board...
Human population expanded during Late Stone Age
Genetic evidence is revealing that human populations began to expand in size in Africa during the Late Stone Age approximately 40,000 years ago. A research team led by Michael F....
Prehistoric hut gives clues to ancient Alp life
Archaeologists in Switzerland have excavated the ruins of the oldest hut in the Alps, a prehistoric discovery that dates back nearly 3,000 years. The find in the Silvretta mountains near...
40,000-year-old human bone found off the Dutch coast
A fishing boat trawling for mussels off the Dutch coast has instead landed a 40,000-year-old human bone, German scientists said after examining the find. Anthropologists from the University of Leipzig...
Caithness broch centre opened
A new centre focusing on the brochs of the far north of Scotland opened at the weekend. Caithness Archaeological Trust has spearheaded the transformation of the former Northlands Viking Centre,...
Remains of an ancient paraplegic found in Vietnam
Archaeologists have uncovered the ancient remains of a young man in northern Vietnam who could be the oldest known paraplegic in the world. The discovery has astounded researchers, showing the...
5,000 year-old circular site discovered in Northern Ireland
Traces of a Neolithic site near Ballygawley (County Tyrone, Northern Ireland) have been discovered by archaeologists working on the site of the A4 dual carriageway. The three-year long excavation project,...
In search of prehistoric settlements off the coast of Florida
Andrew Hemmings walked on a Florida (USA) beach that man hasn't set foot on in more than 13,000 years. Not because it isn't a popular stretch of real estate -...
Welsh hillfort comes to life
Piecing together art and history, pupils from Ysgol Caer Drewyn, Corwen (Denbighshire, north-east Wales), took part in a mosaic project with artist Patricia Jones aimed at promoting the Iron Age...
Study into hidden history of Pendle Hill in Lancashire
The history of Pendle Hill (Lancashire, England) is to be pieced together for the first time with the help of archaeologists. Pendle Forest History Group is teaming up with staff...
Ancient warrior's skeleton found near Rome
Italy's police squad for art says an ancient warrior's skeleton has been found floating in a tomb filled with sea water on a beach near Rome (Italy). The bones are...
8 August 2009
8,000-year-old human skeleton found in Turkey
An 8,000-year-old human skeleton was found during excavations in one of the oldest residential areas in southern Turkey, a media report said. The skeleton was discovered inside a Neolithic-age tomb...
New study on Flores 'hobbits'
In 2003, archaeologists excavating in a cave on the Indonesian island of Flores made a discovery that forced scientists to completely rethink conventional theories of human evolution. They reported the...
Domestic dog origins challenged
The suggestion that the domestic dog originated in East Asia has been challenged. The huge genetic diversity of dogs found in East Asia had led many scientists to conclude that...
Skara Brae and other coastal sites threatened by erosion
It is one of the best preserved Stone Age villages in Europe, but Skara Brae in Orkney (Scotland) is just a few metres from the sea and it is a...
Bronze Age settlement discovered in Hungary
Archaeologists of Debrecen's Deri Museum have discovered 4,000-year-old remains of a settlement during earthworks connected to a local sewage treatment project, leader of the excavations Krisztian Szilagyi said. A team...
Array of archaeological sites and finds uncovered in Ireland
Inevitable pieces of modern infrastructure for the future, motorways have also opened a window to the past as archaeological digs have revealed a wide ranging number of pre-historic, early medieval...
Calls for remains to be returned to Stonehenge
A druid protester is calling for remains taken from the Stonehenge World Heritage site to be returned - and has collected thousands of signatures on a petition backing his call....
Ancient burial ground gets national designation in California
A site that is widely regarded as an ancient American Indian burial ground at the Bolsa Chica Mesa (California, USA) has received national historic designation, exciting preservationists who say the...
13 ancient burial sites, temples unearthed in Lebanon
A British Museum delegation uncovered 13 burial sites, temples and personal items dating to the Canaanite period (Bronze Age) in Sidon's Freres archeological site. "We uncovered the biggest number of...
Engraved map from 14,000 years ago discovered in Spain
A stone tablet found in a cave in Abauntz (Navarra, northern Spain) - which was traditionally thought to be the home of the 'lamias' or mythological bird-footed nymphs - is...
Cuneiform tablets found in 2,700-year old Turkish temple
Excavations at the site of a recently discovered temple in southeastern Turkey have uncovered a cache of cuneiform tablets dating back to the Iron Age period between 1200 and 600...
Archaeologists reveal cannibalism link to early Britons
A human bone found in Devon (England) with tool cuts thought to have been made during a ritual ceremony 9,000 years ago may be evidence of cannibalism. Torquay Museum staff...
Bronze Age burials eroding in Northumberland
An amateur archaeologist, Jim Nesbitt, has discovered that coastline erosion at Low Hauxley (Northumberland, England) has caused a cist containing cremated human bone to be eroded from the cliff face...
15 August 2009
Early Bronze Age artefacts discovered in Prague
When repairing Terronská Street in Bubeneč, Prague (Czech Republic), archaeologists discovered artefacts from the Early Bronze Age. The most interesting is the ceramic mould of the lower part of a...
Ancient plantations unearthed in Gozo
Archaeologists in Gozo (Malta) have found that troughsand plantations in MÄ¡arr Ix-Xini may date back to about 600 BCE. The Gozo Ministry said excavations, which began four years ago, tried...
Archaeologist creates stir with new book on Cahokia Mounds
According to a new book by University of Illinois archaeologist and professor of anthropology Tim Pauketat, the mound builders were not always the idyllic, corn-growing, pottery-making, fishing-hunting gentle villagers depicted...
Discovery of log boat in Yorkshire shows how sea levels rose
The discovery of a prehistoric boat which had been buried for more than 2,000 years beneath a farm field has already provided historians with an insight into Iron Age life...
Excavation of an earthowrk site in Louisiana comes to conclusion
A major archaeological excavation at Poverty Point State Historic Site (Louisiana, USA) recently concluded, under the leadership and guidance of Diana Greenlee, station archaeologist and adjunct assistant professor in the...
Paleolithic cave site discovered in China
An important Paleolithic cave site, named 'Water Curtain Cave Site', was discovered in the Huhushui Scenic Area in Heibei Province, north China. This site is located in the steep ridges...
Prehistoric Czech people had contact with Black Sea area
The finds archaeologists have uncovered in Mikulovice in the Pardubice region (Czech Republic) prove that the local prehistoric people had contacts with the Black Sea area in the 6-5th centuries...
More info on the prehistoric dwelling discovered in the Isle of Man
As we reported last July 19th, the remains of a 9,000-year-old hunter-gatherers' house, uncovered during construction at an airport, have been unearthed in Great Britain's Isle of Man. The house...
Bronze Age boat recreated at Scottish loch
A team of history and woodwork experts have teamed up to build a replica Bronze Age logboat at Loch Tay (Perthshire, Scotland). The group will work with the tools and...
Memorial planned to Bronze Age man
The remarkable story of an early Bronze Age man unearthed on a Howe of Fife (Scotland) farm has been recalled at an event aimed at raising funds to give him...
Neanderthals didn't like Brussels sprouts
Spanish researchers say they're a step closer to resolving a mystery of evolution - why some people like Brussels sprouts but others hate them. They have found that a gene...
Unique Bronze Age burial uncovered in Scotland
Archaeologists in Perthshire (Scotland) have unearthed a spectacular early Bronze Age grave containing a gold-banded dagger still wrapped in its 4,000-year-old sheath. The discovery was made by archaeologists from Glasgow...
Human bones found in Cumbria are 3,000 years old
Human remains found on an isolated shoreline in northern England are more than 3,000 years old. Archaeologists and police discovered the human bones at Hodbarrow Point (Cumbria, England) in February,...
London's earliest timber structure found
London's oldest timber structure has been unearthed by archaeologists from Archaeology South-East (part of the Institute of Archaeology at UCL). It was found during the excavation of a prehistoric peat...
5,000-year-old spear point found by a boy in Florida
Jordan Emmett, 8, was walking past a street construction project near his Safety Harbor home (Florida, USA) when he saw something red sticking out of the dirt. At first, his...
Prehistoric skeleton found near hillfort in Derbyshire
A prehistoric skeleton has been unearthed by archaeologists during a dig at a Peak District beauty spot. The skeleton emerged as volunteers excavated the site of an ancient hillfort near...
Early humans used fire to engineer tools from stone
Evidence that early modern humans living on the coast of the far southern tip of Africa 72,000 years ago employed pyrotechnology - the controlled use of fire - to increase...
Neolithic stone axehead discovered in Scotland
A Neolithic stone axehead was among the rare artefacts unearthed during a busy year for Scottish treasure hunters. It forms part of Scotland's annual Treasure Trove, items found by archaeologists...
Massive Neolithic building unearthed in Orkney dig
Experts have unearthed a Neolithic 'cathedral' - a massive building of a kind never before seen in Britain - which has left them in awe of its scale and workmanship....
5,000 year-old sites found in Derry
Archaeologists have unearthed eight neolithic sites in Derry (Northern Ireland), some more than 5,000 years old. The exciting discoveries were made during work on the new Maydown dual carriageway and...
Student discovers a Neolithic flint dagger in Suffolk
When Lydia Bareham first saw a piece of stone sticking out of the path in front of her, it looked like an ordinary piece of rock. But when the 16-year-old...
22 August 2009
Australia's first astronomers
Aboriginal people have been described as 'the world's first astronomers'. The Yolngu people in Arnhem Land, for example, have dreaming stories that explain tides, eclipses, the rising and setting sun...
4,000-year-old tomb found empty on Exmoor
Last week, in the bogs of Exmoor (England) a team of archaeologists started excavating a tomb which had not been opened for the best part of 4,000 years. It was...
Ground broken for new park at ancient Miami Circle
The Miami Circle, the 2,000-year-old Native American site that taxpayers shelled out $27 million to buy 10 years ago, may finally open to the public under a frugal state plan...
Additional information on the timber circle found in Tyrone
As we reported in our article published last August 1st, 2009, the remains of a timber circle from more than 4,000 years ago have been uncovered by archaeologists in County...
Early land-clearing may have altered global climate
Massive burning of forests for agriculture thousands of years ago may have increased atmospheric carbon dioxide enough to alter global climate and usher in a warming trend that continues today,...
16,000-year-old figurine unearthed in Turkey
Archeologists unearthed 16,000 year-old mother goddess figurine during excavations in Direkli Cave in the southern province of Kahramanmaraş. Gazi University Archeology Department lecturer Cevdet Merih Erek said that the excavations...
Ancient stone artwork discovered in Scotland
Prehistoric artwork has been discovered by an amateur archaeologist at a Perthshire mountain range (Scotland). The ancient carvings were discovered by rock art enthusiast George Currie at Ben Lawers, near...
Clues to Caribbean's earliest inhabitants
A prehistoric water-filled cave in the Dominican Republic has become a 'treasure trove' with the announcement by archaeologists of the discovery of stone tools, a small primate skull in remarkable...
Did ancient humans cause the extinction of the pygmy hippo?
Thousands of prehistoric hippo bones found in Cyprus are adding to a growing debate on the possible role of humans in the extinction of larger animals 12,000 years ago. First...
3,000-year-old butter found in Irish bog
An oak barrel, full of butter, estimated to be roughly 3,000 years old has been found in Gilltown bog, between Timahoe and Staplestown (Kildare, Ireland). The amazing discovery of the...
Coastal damage by early inhabitants
The idea that primitive hunter-gatherers lived in harmony with the landscape has long been challenged by researchers, who say Stone Age humans in fact wiped out many animal species in...
China's founding legend may not be true
China's founding dynasty may just be a myth, say archaeologists. In a news report published in Science magazine, writer Andrew Lawler surveys a decade's worth of discoveries suggesting ancient China...
Earliest image of a human discovered in Scotland
A 5,000-year-old carving discovered in the Orkney Islands is being hailed as the oldest face in Scotland by archaeologists. At first glance, it appears little more than a tiny fragment...
The mystery of Nigeria's Nok culture
Some 2,500 years ago, a mysterious culture emerged in Nigeria. The Nok people left behind bizarre terracotta statues - and little else. Archaeologists are now looking for more clues to...
Spanish prehistoric sites in danger
A large number of prehistoric archaeological sites in the Valencia Region (Spain) do not have adequate protection and are open to acts of vandalism and stealing, a report warned. The...
30 August 2009
Land of the Standing Stones
How do you capture the spirit of an area through music? How can one piece of music reflect the diversity of an area such as Aberdeenshire (Scotland)? Aberdeenshire Council's Arts...
A Celt in China: the mysterious origins of Cherchen Man
Cherchen Man, who died around 1000 BCE, is tall, dark-haired, clad in a red tunic and tartan leggings and sporting a beard as ginger as a burning fox. His DNA...
Clues to a prehistoric raid from skeletons at a German site
Thirteen people who perished around 4,600 years ago still have something to say about life and death in prehistoric Europe. Analyses of their skeletal remains, found in 2005 in four...
Spear tip sheds light on ancient people in Arizona
A rare architectural relic discovered in Sahuarita and on its way to the Arizona State Museum in Tucson (USA) could help illuminate the way early humans lived in this part...
Ancient burial mounds to be razed in Bahrain
Ancient burial mounds in a Bahraini village, which the government hoped to have recognised as a World Heritage Site, will be bulldozed to make way for a new road, houses...
The enigmatic stone mounds of Alabama
More than 1,000 years ago, people walked the hills of what is now Calhoun County (USA). Most traces of them are gone, but the American Indians who called this land...
Exploration into how prehistoric Italians made their living
Archaeologists at the University of Bradford will be leading an exploration into how prehistoric people made their living in Italy at the end of the Ice Age. The research aims...
Tiny ancient shells point to earliest fashion trend
Shell beads newly unearthed from four sites in Morocco confirm early humans were consistently wearing and potentially trading symbolic jewellery as early as 80,000 years ago. These beads add significantly...
Temple shelters in Malta 'enhance visitors' experience'
Public response to the new shelters at Ħaġar Qim and Mnajdra has been 'very positive', according to Heritage Malta's senior curator for prehistoric sites. Reuben Grima, who gathered feedback from...
Unearthing Bronze Age Dartmoor
Simon Hughes and his team are relishing working on the Bellever roundhouse. "It's a great project for us," he says. "It's a chance to really try to find out what...
Racing against time to save prehistoric Orkney site
The site at the Links of Noltland on the island of Westray on the northern fringes of the Orkney islands (Scotland) is emerging as one of the UK's most important...
British caves give up more secrets
A new dig to find evidence of Britain's first man starts in Torquay (Devon, England) next week. The team of archaeologists are back at Kents Cavern to continue their major...
Artefacts uncovered during roadworks give hints on early Irish life
The remains of a 9,000-year-old fishing basket uncovered at Clowanstown in Co Meath (Ireland) and an 'exceptional' raised wooden trackway close to the Dromod-Roosky bypass, were described at an archaeology...

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