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Archaeo News  

March 2011 index:

2 March 2011
Ancient cave culture unearthed in Nepal
Archaeologists and other experts rummaged through remote cliffside cave complexes in Nepal for five years has come up with the remains of prehistoric people, their arts and manuscripts, providing a...
Siberian prehistoric dog spent his life alongside humans
A male dog that lived 7,000 years ago in Siberia ate human food and was buried as though he were a human. The Husky-like dog's remains suggest he worked alongside...
6 March 2011
Lake Huron probed for signs of prehistoric hunters
Guided by computer simulations that reconstruct a lost world now lying at the bottom of Lake Huron, a team of scientists is preparing to search this spring for ancient artifacts...
Bronze Age items found in Nottinghamshire
A treasure hunter has found 18 Bronze Age items in a field near Newark in Nottinghamshire (England). Maurice Richardson stumbled across the collection, which includes four socket axes, a spear...
Project to save cairns on British moor
A project to improve the condition of prehistoric cairns on Dartmoor (Devon, England) has been nominated for a national award in Britain. The Dartmoor Cairn Repair Project has been shortlisted...
Early hunters' tools identified in California
A collection of delicate stone tools discovered on California's Channel Islands (USA) indicate that early humans in the Americas were hunting local waterfowl some 11,200 to 12,200 years ago. "The...
8 March 2011
Neanderthals: copycats or innovators?
The question of whether Neanderthals had the ability to innovate new kinds of tools, and not just imitate, is coming up in scientific circles. For the past few decades, most...
Was early farming less productive than foraging?
Thousands of years ago, our ancestors gave up foraging for food and took up farming, one of the most important and debated decisions in history. A new study by Samuel...
Heritage status for ancient ochre mine in Australia
A 30,000-year-old ochre mine in outback Western Australia has been granted national heritage status by the federal government, a move that will help protect the historic site from encroaching iron...
Early humans may have originated from southern Africa
Modern humans may have originated from southern Africa, an extensive genetic study has suggested. Data showed that hunter-gatherer populations in the region had the greatest degree of genetic diversity, which...
17 March 2011
Laser scan for Stonehenge
Stonehenge is being scanned using modern laser technology to search for hidden clues about how and why it was built. The survey includes all the visible faces of the standing...
Bronze Age burial pots found in Scotland
Two Bronze Age burial pots containing human remains have been found at the base of an Angus standing stone (Scotland) which toppled over during this winter's bad weather. Both pots...
Archaeologists start excavating stone circle in India
Department of ancient Indian history, culture and archaeology (AIHCA) of Nagpur University has begun excavations of a megalithic circle near village Sawri in Bhadrawati tehsil. This unique megalithic circle was...
Complete Neolithic pot unearthed in Oxfordshire
Archaeologists working on a housing development in Oxfordshire (England) claim to have found one of the oldest complete pots in the country. The Neolithic find was discovered on a housing...
Wind turbine plan threatens Scottish stone circle
A contentious plan to erect a wind turbine may put under threat a prehistoric stone circle in Aberdeenshire (Scotland). The proposed development at Newbigging Farm, Chapel of Garioch, near Inverurie,...
20 March 2011
Skulls in ancient Scottish tomb show signs of violent death
Scientists discovered that human skulls buried in the famous Tomb of the Eagles (Orkney, Scotland) displayed signs of serious wounds inflicted by weapons. Archaelogists who studied all 85 skulls from...
Britain's oldest properly engineered road found
Archaeologists have found Britain's oldest properly engineered road, and the discovery could change the way we look at a key aspect of British history. The discoveries, in Shropshire (England), suggest...
Neolithic house replica built by British schoolchildren
Children have built a Neolithic-style chalk house in the grounds of a Brighton (East Sussex, England) primary school. Youngsters from ten schools took part in the project, with the chalk...
Prehistoric haul found by amateurs in Cornwall
One of the largest collections of prehistoric artefacts ever found in Cornwall (England) has been uncovered by Graham Hill and Dave Edwards: two amateur archaeologists from Penzance. The two discovered...
Investigation of a Bronze Age barrow in Sussex
An investigation is under way into the significance of an Early Bronze Age barrow which has been revealed on the edge of a sandpit near Midhurst (West Sussex, England). The...
10,000-year-old spear found in Florida
Archaeologists hope a major find in a spring an hour and a half south of Tampa helps piece together how Florida's (USA) earliest inhabitants lived. Dive teams from the Florida...
22 March 2011
The last Neanderthals - artifacts found in Greece
It has long been thought that the Neanderthal hunter gatherers kept to lower altitudes, where game and wild animals would have been more plentiful. However, Greek archaeologists, working in the...
Did Neanderthals discover fire?
Our Neanderthal ancestors may not have been as stupid as we have been lead to believe. It is widely accepted by archaeologists that the major technological achievements of early humans...
27 March 2011
'Tree Islands' in Florida, built on prehistoric trash?
Piles of garbage left by humans thousands of years ago may have helped form tree-covered biodiversity hot spots in the Florida Everglades (USA), according to a new study. The so-called...
3,000-year-old items discovered in southern China
The Jiangxi Provincial Institute of Cultural Relics and Archaeology (JPICRA) and the cultural heritage administrative departments of Jinxian County (China) made archaeological excavations at the Nantudun site in Jinxian County...
Hand ax innovators reached Asia earlier than thought
Finds unearthed in southeastern India offer a cutting-edge revision of hominid migrations out of Africa more than 1 million years ago that spread pivotal tool-making methods. Makers of a specific...
11,000-year-old settlement unearthed in Syria
A Syrian-French archaeological mission unearthed a small village in the archaeological site of Tel Qarasa (hill) in the west of Swaida province (Syria), dating back to around 11,000 years. The...
Cornish stone circle damaged by cattle
Longhorn cattle introduced as part of a Higher Level Stewardship conservation grazing scheme onto Carnyorth Common near St Just (Cornwall, England) have destabilised a stone of the ancient Tregeseal Circle....
Iron Age hill fort still being quarried in Somerset
Stone will continue to be quarried from Ham Hill Country Park near Yeovil, Somerset (England), for the next 80 years after planning permission to extend the site was agreed. The...
New discovery revises understanding about first North Americans
The first human inhabitants of North America settled at least 2,000 years earlier than the people previously identified as the first Americans. So say archaeologists, who have unearthed a trove...
Ancient sites protection call on Scottish wind farm site
Archaeologists have asked that Neolithic and Iron Age sites be protected during the construction of a new wind farm in Caithness (Scotland). Npower Renewables propose erecting nine turbines at Burn...
31 March 2011
'Funny shaped stone' was Stone Age axe head
A 'funny shaped stone' that had been used as an ornament, turned out to be a 5,000 year old Stone Age axe head. The axe head had been dug up...
Welsh Rock Art - a unique find in Anglesey
New excavations have recently been carried out by the Welsh Rock Art Association, on a piece of megalithic rock art, known locally as the 'Llwydiarth Esgob Farm Stone'. The farm...

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