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Archaeo News  

January 2013 index:

7 January 2013
Silbury Hill badly damaged by trespassers
Trespassers on a rain-soaked monument in Wiltshire (England) are causing 'spectacular' damage, an archaeologist has warned. Heavy rain has led to standing water around Silbury Hill in Avebury - the...
More than 300 prehistoric clay figurines unearthed in Greece
Archaeologists from the University of Southampton (England) studying a Neolithic archaeological site in central Greece have helped unearth over 300 clay figurines, one of the highest density for such finds...
8 January 2013
Privacy hedges date back to the Iron Age
Some of the first archaeological evidence of landscape boundaries dates back to England around 1,500 BCE, but 500 years later it also appears in the rest of northwestern Europe, all...
Iron Age village uncovered in England
The remains of the recently discovered village in Barton Seagrave, 125 kilometres north-northwest of London, was made in advance of housing development. Carol Simmonds, from Northamptonshire Archaeology, said: "Archaeologically, the...
17 January 2013
Modern 'palaeo diet' not as good as the original
It has been a long held belief that Stone Age hunter-gatherers, from the Palaeolithic and Mesolithic periods, had a truly carbohydrate free diet. This belief was based on the assumption...
Mesolithic man should be re-named 'hunter-gatherer-farmer'
Recent research by the University of Reading (UK), Department of Archaeology, has cast some doubt on the long held belief that Mesolithic man was solely a hunter-gatherer. The evidence to...
18 January 2013
Vietnamese caves occupied for over 11,000 years
Recent excavations in the Vietnamese central province of Thanh Hoa have revealed evidence of occupation of a particular cave, known as Con Moong, over a continuous period from 18,000 BCE...
Intact Neolithic floor surface uncovered in Cyprus
A floor surface from the Neolithic era has been uncovered at the Ayia Varvara-Asprokremmos site in Cyprus. The floor was 'exposed for the first time in 10,000 years,' according to...
Storms expose Iron Age skeleton in Shetland
Archaeologists said a structure was briefly exposed at Channerwick (Shetland, Scotland) before being buried again by a rockfall over the festive period. Before it disappeared from view, police officers and...
19 January 2013
Stone circle found at church in Northern England
Archaeologists working at an historic church in North-East England have discovered evidence that the site may have been used for worship since the Stone Age. St Michael and All Angels,...
Prehistoric rock art site found in Western India
A prehistoric rock art site has been discovered at Kappikunnu near Pulppally in Wayanad district (India). The petroglyphs bear a close resemblance to those on the walls of the Edakkal...
Neolithic remains discovered in Istanbul
A team of Turkish archeologists has unearthed traces of a Neolithic settlement dating back over eight millennia in Pendik district in Istanbul (Turkey). The site was uncovered during the construction...
21 January 2013
Baby bones found in ancient Italian village
About 25 kilometres from Siena in Tuscany, the settlement of Poggio Civitate dates back to at least the late eighth century BCE. Archaeologists excavating the site have found evidence of...
4,000-year-old shaman's stones discovered in Panama
Ruth Dickau, from the University of Exeter (England), unearthed 12 unusual stones in the back of the small, prehistoric Casita de Piedra rock-shelter near the town of Boquete in 2007....
22 January 2013
War was central to Europe's first civilisation
Research from the University of Sheffield (UK) shows that the ancient Minoan civilisation of Crete had strong martial traditions, contradicting the commonly held view of Minoans as a peace-loving people....
Indians 'broke Australian isolation 4,000 years ago'
Genetic analysis of more than 300 Aborigines, Indians, and people from Papua New Guinea and islands of south-east Asia has found a "significant gene flow" from India to Australia about...
25 January 2013
Prehistoric headless skeleton unearthed in Cambridgeshire
Archaeologists have unearthed decapitated human remains beneath former allotment land in Soham (Cambridgeshire, England). Experts from the Hertford-based firm Archaeological Solutions are currently excavating a Roman settlement on land off...
Campaign renewed to save Iron Age fort in Scotland
Campaigners are renewing their long-running appeal to stop an ancient Iron Age hill fort from being quarried in Scotland. Dumbarton residents, green activists and archaeologists are aiming to halt the...
26 January 2013
Ancient Chinese arrowhead found in Japan
Archaeologists say an ancient Chinese arrowhead unearthed in Okayama City in Western Japan is the first of its kind discovered in the country. The bronze arrowhead has been dated to...
28 January 2013
Loom weights reveal weaving in Turkey 2,500 years ago
The northwestern province of Canakkale's Ayvacik district is home to one of the most important areas of Turkey's textile industry, famous for kilim carpets produced in different colours and designs....
9,000-year-old remains discovered in England
Archaeologists have proved for the first time that people started living in the Didcot area, 90 kilometres west of London, as early as 9,000 years ago. Rob Masefield, director of...
29 January 2013
Archeologists revise image of ancient Celts
The Celts were long considered a barbaric and violent society, but new findings from a 2,600-year-old grave in southwest Germany suggest the ancient people were much more sophisticated. In 2010,...
Human skull found beneath Scottish golf course
Archaeologists are to investigate a human skull found by council workers carrying out winter maintenance in a sand bunker by the fourth hole on Musselburgh Links Golf Course - officially...
31 January 2013
Early sweet potato trade
What is the difference between a Kumara and a Batata? Very little apparently - they are the Maori and Spanish names, respectively, for the sweet potato. It has been a...

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