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Archaeo News  

November 2013 index:

6 November 2013
New Stonehenge visitor centre
The first of long overdue improvements to the Stonehenge World Heritage Site experience will be opened to the public on 18 December 2013. A new state of the art visitor...
Extreme archaeology in the mountains of Wyoming
The incidence of high altitude settlements in North America is rare and to date only 6 had been found. Now a team of archaeologists from the Colorado State University (USA)...
Ancient mural may be first picture of volcanic blast
In 1963, archaeologist James Mellaart found a large mural on the wall of a house in Çatalhöyük, Turkey - the largest known Stone Age town. He interpreted it as depicting...
7 November 2013
Early stone tool making more sophisticated than thought
Researchers at the University of Liverpool (England) have found that long and slender stone tools were made by human ancestors at least a million years ago - nearly twice as...
One of the oldest cases of tuberculosis discovered
Tuberculosis was present in Europe as early as 7000 years ago, according to Muriel Masson and colleagues at the University of Szeged, Hungary. Hypertrophic Pulmonary Osteopathy, a secondary disease caused...
Cemetery dating back more than 2500 years studied in Poland
A large Lusatian culture community cemetery from the late Bronze and Early Iron Age has been excavated by archaeologists near Wagrowiec. Head of research Marcin Krzepkowski says the team studied...
12 November 2013
Spear points raise questions about human arrival in North America
The late Pleistocene dispersal of Homo sapiens across the Americas is one of the greatest chapters in the history of our species, but major questions remain unanswered. A new paper...
Fire setting at Stone Age Norwegian quarries
Extraction marks in the Melsvik Stone Age chert quarries near Alta in northern Norway are difficult to explain by any other ancient technique than fire setting. University Museum of Tromso...
13 November 2013
Preparing for death in Bronze Age Scotland
The discovery of 3 cists in southwest Scotland in close proximity to one another has intrigued archaeologists. One contained the burial of a juvenile, while the other two had never...
Arminghall Henge in space and time
The Arminghall Henge is one of East Anglia's most significant prehistoric field monuments. It lies near the confluence of two rivers, less than 4 kilometres south of the centre of...
14 November 2013
Study solves a 3,000-year-old mystery with pollen
Pollen grains are one of the most durable organic materials in nature, best preserved in lakes and deserts and lasting thousands of years. Each plant produces its own distinct pollen...
Donkey sanctuary threatens Bronze Age sites in Ireland
Kerry County Council confirmed it had given the go-ahead for a donkey sanctuary and roadway now under construction in a unique Bronze Age valley near the Conor Pass - the...
Dig reveals secrets of prehistoric Cambridge
A huge archaeological dig on the edge of Cambridge (Cambridgeshire, England) has uncovered evidence of people living in the area in prehistoric times. In what is described as the largest...
15 November 2013
6,000 years of occupation in Alsace
Obernai is a commune in the Bas-Rhin Department in Alsace in north-eastern France. As part of the requirement for planning on a new development, prior to construction commencing, INRAP (the...
Ancient palace begins to be uncovered in Turkey
There is a large archaeological site in the Kayseri province of central Turkey, known as Kultepe. The literal translation from the Turkish is 'Ash Hill'. The site was first identified...
20 November 2013
Chavin oracle discovered in Peru
A civilisation known as the Chavin culture was prevalent in the South American country of Peru from approximately 900-200 BCE, pre-dating the Inca civilisation. It flourished in the northern Andean...
New app to explore the archaeology of Wales
In what is believed to be a first anywhere in the world, the combined Welsh Archaeological Trusts have teamed up with the University of South Wales to launch the Archwilio...
23 November 2013
Cattle farming in China 10,000 years ago
Research led by Professor Michi Hofreiter from the Department of Biology at the University of York and Professor Hucai Zhang of Yunnan Normal University established clear fossil evidence that cattle...
Bronze Age pottery unearthed near Ipswich
An archaeological dig on the site of a former World War Two airfield in Suffolk (England) has revealed evidence of Bronze Age burial chambers. The site, on the outskirts of...
25 November 2013
Ancient mounds and a paddle discovered in Northumberland
Archaeologists working on the Bradford Kaims Wetland Heritage Project in Northumberland (Northeast England) have unearthed a series of hugely significant monuments forming a complex prehistoric landscape, with at least 12...
Ancient human history encoded in music
An international team led by McMaster University psychologist Steven Brown has established that the history of human populations is embedded in music, where complex combinations of rhythm, pitch and arrangement...
Bluestones of Stonehenge: located the true source
The celebrated geologist Herbert Henry Thomas first proposed in 1923 that the rocks which form the giant inner ring of the Stonehenge monument - so-called bluestones - were specifically quarried...
28 November 2013
Iron Age hill fort threatened by luxury homes
Old Oswestry is one of Europe's best preserved Iron Age hill forts, seen for miles around the west of England for over 3,000 years. Legends say it was the birthplace...
Scientists disagree on age of Serpent Mound
Serpent Mound - a 411 m-long prehistoric effigy mound located on a plateau in Ohio (USA) - was excavated by Frederic Ward Putnam in the late 1800s. Putnam didn't find...
Development threatens stone circle in Malta
Two brand new two-storey terraced houses are being proposed in the buffer zone of the Xaghra Stone Circle, which forms part of the Ggantija complex, a UNESCO World Heritage site...
29 November 2013
Ancient Siberian genome reveals origins of Native Americans
In the late 1920s, the skeletal remains of a young boy, believed to be 24,000 years old, were discovered near the village of Mal'ta near Lake Baikal in south-central Siberia....

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