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Archaeo News  

November 2016 index:

7 November 2016
Well preserved pottery found inside Gwynedd quarry dig
Archaeologists working in a Gwynedd quarry (Wales) discovered an ancient cemetery containing some of the best preserved Bronze Age pottery ever found in the area. The team from Brython Archaeology...
How ancient humans reached remote South Pacific islands
Some 3,400 years ago, people on the Solomon Islands left their shores for the seas of the South Pacific. Their adventures brought humanity to the most remote reaches of Oceania,...
9,000-year-old axe sheds light on Irish burial practices
Analysis of an axe that is more than 9,000 years old, found at Ireland's earliest burial site, in Co Limerick, has shed light on the ancient burial practices of Irish...
Bronze Age city discovered in Iraq
Archaeologists from the Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies (IANES) at the University of Tübingen have uncovered a large Bronze Age city not far from the town of Dohuk in...
Dublin dig uncovers prehistoric rock art
Dublin's Hellfire Club has been a place shrouded in myth and mystery; its infamy stems from the fact it was built using stone from ancient tombs - essentially grave robbing....
8 November 2016
Ancient cannabis 'burial shroud' in chinese oasis
Archaeologists say cannabis found in an ancient burial in northwest China adds considerably to our understanding of how ancient Eurasian cultures used the plant. Thirteen female cannabis plants almost three...
Definitive report on the famous Calanais Stones
The extraordinary cross-shaped setting of ancient monoliths erected 5,000 years ago at Callanais in the Western Isles of Scotland predates Stonehenge, and was an important focus of ritual activity for...
Teeth reveal Britons were highly mobile 4,000 years ago
Archaeologists have created a new database from the teeth of prehistoric humans found at ancient burial sites in Britain and Ireland that tell us a lot about their climate, their...
Dartmoor stone circle test excavations
Sittaford Stone Circle, located in Devon (England) was revealed by the actions of peat cutters in more recent centuries, and rediscovered in 2008 by a local amateur archaeologist after a...
11 November 2016
Australia holds earliest evidence of ground-edge axe technology
Earlier this year, a team of Australian researchers published new findings about a fragment of a ground-edge axe discovered in the Kimberly region of Australia. The flake had been excavated...
Aboriginal astronomy provides clues to ancient life
An ancient Australian Aboriginal site in the Victorian bush could be the oldest astronomical observatory in the world. Scientists studying the Wurdi Youang stone arrangement say it could date back...
Archaeological evidence at major risk in British wetlands
In the first study of its kind to assess how changing conditions affect the preservation of organic remains at wetland sites, scientists at the University of York analysed bone and...
12 November 2016
Palaeolithic jewellery still eye-catching after 50,000 years
A fascinating collection of jewellery made of ostrich eggshells is being assembled by archeologists working in the world famous Denisova cave in Altai region of Siberia. The beads were found...
20 November 2016
5,600-year-old religious centre discovered near Stonehenge
The first major early Neolithic monument to be discovered in the area for more than a century, evidence of a 200 metre diameter religious and ceremonial complex built about 5,650...
25 November 2016
Hunter-gatherers in Florida 14,500 years ago
There is growing evidence that people reached a land bridge connecting northeastern Asia to what is now Alaska around 23,000 years ago, arriving in the Americas perhaps 18,000 to 16,000...
Neolithic amulet in Pakistan
A 6,000-year-old amulet discovered in 1985 at Mehragarh, a Neolithic site in western Pakistan, has been analysed using a new photoluminescence technique. Having reached the limits of what they could...
People consumed milk and cheese 9,000 years ago
Researchers analysing more than 500 pottery vessels from 82 sites in the northern Mediterranean dating from the seventh to fifth millennia BCE found that dairy farming was popular in some...
Oldest bone jewellery found in Australia
A piece of bone in Australia looks as if it was designed to be worn in the nasal septum - making it the oldest bone jewellery anywhere in the world...
26 November 2016
4,500-year-old Canaanite citadel's final hours
Excavations beneath a layer of ash and rock inside a pillared hall of the ruined palace within a 4,500-year-old citadel Khirbet al-Batrawy, on the fringes of the black desert in...
Burnt mound being excavated in Scotland
Prehistoric and Bronze Age finds have been made during work to construct the new Inverness West Link road (Highland, Scotland). Pottery fragments and the remains of kilns used for drying...
Treasure hunters damage ancient hill fort in Sussex
An ancient hill fort dubbed 'one of the jewels in the crown' of the South Downs National Park (southern England) has been damaged, police have said. Illegal metal detecting is...
28 November 2016
Huge Bronze Age gold torc unearthed in Cambridgeshire
A gigantic gold torc, so big one expert thinks it may have been worn to protect a pregnant woman, has been found in a ploughed field in Cambridgeshire (England). It...
30 November 2016
Copper Age human bone amulet discovered in Bulgaria
A team of researchers from Sofia University (Bulgaria) have been excavating a known Chalcolithic Settlement on the edge of Kaleshkovo, in the Southeast of the country. A study of the...
Violent deaths led to disrespectful burials
A team from the University of Arizona (USA) has been conducting a study of ancient burial sites in the Sonoran Desert, on the border between the USA and Mexico. The...
Amazing discovery of prehistoric rock art in Australia
Sometimes a stroke of luck or an accidental event can lead to the most amazing discoveries. Giles Hamm of La Trobe University, Australia, had been surveying gorges in the Flinders...

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