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Archaeo News  

March 2009 index:

10 March 2009
Knowth damaged in ancient times by early 'vandals'
Irish archaeologists excavating a prehistoric tomb north of Dublin have discovered that ancient 'vandals' left graffiti on the stonework, Environment Minister John Gormley said. Scientists have been working for almost...
Discovery of 6000-year-old artefacts in Iran
Archaeologists reported the conclusion of the season of archaeological survey at Mīyān-Rūd Tappeh in Iraj area, of Rāmjerd, in the town of Marvdasht (Fārs Province, Iran). This survey was conducted...
Experts try to decipher ancient Iberian language
When archaeologists on a dig in southern Portugal last year flipped over a heavy chunk of slate and saw writing not used for more than 2,500 years, they were elated....
Bronze Age pottery kiln identified in the Burnt City
During the stratigraphical study conducted on Teppeh-Dasht archaeological site located 3 kilometres away from Burnt City in Sistan-va-Baluchestan Province (Iran), archaeologists have identified a 5000-years-old pottery kiln. "Current evidences verify...
Bronze Age seal discovered in Abu Dhabi
A team working for the Environment Agency - Abu Dhabi (EAD) has found an ancient stone cylinder seal dating back to the beginning of the local Bronze Age, around 5,000...
Ancient hunting techniques revealed
How did humans living in the third millennium BCE manage to find sufficient quantities of meat in the arid desert regions? A new study of the 'desert kites' that are...
Axe handles dredged from North Sea win archaeology award
Prehistoric hand axes discovered in sand and gravel dredged from the North Sea by Hanson Aggregates Marine, have won the Best Archaeological Discovery Award at the prestigious British Archaeology Awards....
Ancient site in Utah may be replaced by a rail hub
A railside development could rob Utahns of a full understanding of their state's ancient past if the Legislature allows construction on the site of a buried village in Draper (Utah,...
Remains from Clovis culture cast doubt on comet theory
The idea that a comet blasted into eastern North America about 10,900 years ago has been receiving a lot of media attention lately. The explosion, which is said to have...
Harappan-era cemetery found
A big housing complex dating back from the Harappan era has been discovered in a little known village about 40 km from Rohtak (Haryana state of India). A cemetery belonging...
Lough Gur proposed for heritage status
Lough Gur, one of Europe's most important archaeological sites and located in Co Limerick (Ireland), could soon be awarded world heritage status. Ireland boasts two listed world heritage sites: Skellig...
Neolithic seal found in Iran
Archeologists have unearthed an ancient cylinder seal dating to at least 3,500 years ago in Iran's northern Mazandaran Province. Archeological excavations at the Kelar Mound in the north of Iran...
Earliest known domestic horses found in Kazakhstan
An international team of archaeologists has uncovered the earliest known evidence of horses being domesticated by humans. The discovery suggests that horses were both ridden and milked. The findings could...
4,000-year-old axe unearthed in London
A flint axe over 4,000 years old was the highlight of a crop of discoveries during a two-year archaeological investigation into the past of the Olympic Park in London (England)....
Online users now can virtually tour Oetzi's body
A Stone Age warrior frozen in an icy tomb for 5,300 years can now be viewed in astonishing detail thanks to a new website. The Iceman photoscan project took 150,000...
16 March 2009
Anglesey rock-art project field school and excavation
From 18th to 22nd June 2009 Archaeology Safaris Ltd. will organize a 4-day Rock-Art Project Field School and Excavation in Anglesey (Wales). For the students taking part there will be...
An enigmatic T-shaped mound in Louisiana
About 3,300 years ago, a group of archaic period Native Americans living in what is now northeast Louisiana (USA) decided to build a great mound. Ninety days after the project...
Iran urbanized 4,500 years ago
Archeological studies have indicated that traces of ancient population in Iran's northern province of Mazandaran goes back 5,600 years. "Archeological excavations and precise date recognition at the historical site of...
70,000-year-old findings unearthed in Orissa
In a major breakthrough, researchers from Sambalpur University recently discovered the cultural remains of a civilisation that is supposed to be more than 70,000 years old. The discovery was made...
Stone Age sandal found in Lake Constance
A woven sandal - last worn 4,900 years ago - has been discovered in Lake Constance in southern Germany. The well-preserved shoe, dating back to the Stone Age, is of...
Prehistoric humans hunkered at Meadowcroft in Pennsylvania
Meadowcroft rock shelter (Pennsylvania) is the oldest known site of human habitation in North America, at least 16,000 years old. Its 52 carbon dates, in almost perfect stratigraphic order, reflect...
German authorities let 7,000-year-old boats rot away
A pair of stone-age boats, thought to be the oldest in Europe, have been allowed to rot in a partially collapsed shed while the northern German regional archaeology authorities stood...
Ancient artifacts excavated in Vietnamese cave
Archaeologists from the Hoa Binh Museum and the Southeast Asia Prehisory Centre (Vietnam) have found more than 4,000 ancient artifacts of stone and bone at the Xom Trai archaeological site...
Iron Age reconstruction underway in Shropshire
Park Hall Countryside Experience, located near Oswestry (Shropshire, England), is undertaking a major new project for 2009 with the reconstruction of an Iron Age roundhouse built using traditional methods by...
Priorities for the conservation of the Côa Valley rock art
The Côa Valley in north-eastern Portugal is one of the most significant prehistoric open-air rock art sites in the world. The majority of engraved motifs has reliably been dated to...
21 March 2009
Bronze Age burial site damaged by Scottish Police
Police officers in northern Scotland have been accused of vandalising a Bronze Age site through ignorance after they removed bones and textiles from a 4,000-year-old burial chamber, apparently because they...
6,000-year old cave paintings found in Peru
More than 10,000 cave paintings - dating back to more than 6,000 years - were discovered by Peruvian archaeologist Quirino Olivera in the Andean country's jungle department of Amazonas. Hidden...
New technology for dating ancient rock paintings
A new dating method finally is allowing archaeologists to incorporate rock paintings into the tapestry of evidence used to study life in prehistoric times. In the study, Marvin W. Rowe...
Walkers are dismantling ancient Yorkshire cairns
British walkers are destroying priceless historic sites - to build hilltop cairns - and now a national park authority has pleaded to visitors to stop the custom to preserve structures...
Rare Iron Age bowls unearthed in Wales
Rare Iron Age artefacts buried as part of a religious offering have been unearthed by an amateur treasure hunter. Two bronze bowls and a bronze wine strainer, described by an...
4,000-year-old 'Abraham's Gate' reopened to public
The Nature and National Parks Protection Authority opened 'Abraham's Gate' at Tel Dan (Israel), for visits by the public. The ancient structure from the Canaanite period of the Bronze Age...
Underwater excavations of a Turkish prehistoric settlement
Archaeologists announced they have begun underwater excavations of the prehistoric site of Limantepe in western Turkey. The underwater research, headed by Professor Hayat Erkanal of the Archaeology Department of the...
A brief history of Stonehenge theories
With March 20 marking the vernal equinox attention turns again to one of the more persistent theories for Stonehenge's origin. In a 1965 book, 'Stonehenge Decoded,' astronomer Gerald Hawkins offered...
Reprint of Xewkija temple report
A limited facsimile edition of Fr Emmanuel Magri's, 'Ruins of a Megalithic Temple at Xeuchia, First Report', is being published by the Salesians of Don Bosco and Heritage Malta as...
Natural stones or ancient megalithic remains in Coate?
A controversial area of land in Swindon (Wiltshire, England) that is earmarked for a housing development could instead become Swindon's own 'mini-Avebury', according to campaigners. The claim comes after ancient...
30 March 2009
New find doesn't end debate on Clovis cache
Last month, University of Colorado archaeologist Douglas Bamforth announced the discovery of a 13,000-year-old cache of 83 stone tools found in Boulder, Colorado (USA). Biochemical analyses of residues on their...
Researchers find the earliest evidence of domesticated maize
Maize was domesticated from its wild ancestor more than 8700 years according to biological evidence uncovered by researchers in the Mexico's Central Balsas River Valley. This is the earliest dated...
Ancient cup marks found in India
A chance visit to a remote Pudukkottai hamlet (Tamil Nadu, India) to assess the damage caused by illegal granite quarrying on an ancient protected archaeological site helped an Archaeological Survey...
First Americans brought anthrax?
Humans were dying of anthrax in North America much earlier than thought - perhaps after scavenging the remains of infected animals while migrating from Asia during the Ice Age-a new...
Neolithic hilltop home discovered near Edinburgh
The remains of a hilltop home believed to be about 5,000 years old have been discovered on the outskirts of Edinburgh (Scotland). The Neolithic roundhouse, found on a site where...
Early agriculture left traces in animal bones
Unraveling the origins of agriculture in different regions around the globe has been a challenge for archeologists. Now researchers writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences report...
Large prehistoric roundhouse unearthed in Somerset
Excavation of a proposed park-and-ride site in Taunton (Somerset, England) has revealed a possible Bronze Age sauna and one of the largest prehistoric roundhouses in Britain. The house dates from...
Germany's stone age cannibalism
The German city of Speyer, in Rheinland-Palatinate, boasts some macabre relics. A collection of skulls, shin bones and vertebrae might not seem unusual in an archaeology museum, but these particular...
Ironware piece from Turkey found to be the oldest steel
Japanese researchers digging in Turkey have pushed back the start of the Iron Age, until now presumed to have begun around 1500 BCE, with the discovery of fragments of an...
New evidence supports China as the cradle of rice cultivation
Dorian Fuller from the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, joined by Zheng Yunfei from Zhejiang Provincial Institute of Antiquity and Archaeology and a few other Chinese archaeologists, investigated rice...
Boulder near Loch Ness could have been an ancient calendar
An amateur archaeologist believes a giant boulder on a hill overlooking Loch Ness (Scottish Highlands) was used as a guide for crop sowing and harvesting by residents of in the...
Archaeologists call for a dig in North Somerset
The potential for prehistoric archaeological finds under a caravan showroom in St Georges (North Somerset, England) could scupper plans to build nine homes on the site. An archaeologist is demanding...
4,000-year-old human skeleton found in Tajikistan
A 4,000-year-old male human skeleton has been discovered in Tajikistan, experts say. The well-preserved skeleton was found by a group of local residents in the foothills near the Tajik village...

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